Environmental Anthropology (MA, MSc), M.A.

  • Application Deadline
  • 12 months
    Duration
  • Tuition Fee
    14670 GBP/year
    Tuition fee
    6500 GBP/year
    Tuition fee
  • English (take IELTS)
    Language
University rank #301 (WUR) ,
Environmental Anthropology (MA, MSc) is offered by the University of Kent. It is an interdisciplinary study into how societies are influenced by the environment and how they manage natural resources and hazards. 

About

This Environmental Anthropology (MA, MSc) programme offered by the University of Kent provides the opportunity to acquire advanced knowledge of how different societies are influenced by the environment and manage natural resources and hazards, in relation to issues in human ecology, biodiversity management, sustainable development, environmental change and the practical applications of such knowledge.

As a graduate of this programme, you will have a range of both practical and evaluative skills, and experience of conducting empirical or other applied research. This allows you to pursue work as a researcher and will inform whatever position you take up in the future. Your expertise will be welcome in a range of organisations including national or international environmental bodies, governmental departments and nongovernmental organisations.

Students have the opportunity to study for an MA or an MSc with students who opt for the MSc being offered the opportunity to take conservation modules taught by researchers from the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE).

We follow an experiential and interactive learning method. We continue to look for innovative ways to present lectures, run seminars and workshops, write exams, design assignments, supervise students and evaluate essays and theses, to ensure that students develop practical expertise as well as an understanding of the methods used by environmental anthropologists.

Generally, you take assessed modules in Environmental Anthropology, Ethnobiological Knowledge Systems, Contemporary Issues in Ethnography, social anthropology, and Research Methods. These modules involve a combination of lectures, seminar discussions and practical laboratories. Additionally, you may opt to attend modules taught in DICE (the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology) on conservation biology, nature and tourism and the international wildlife trade.

There are also informal workshop series in practical methods in conservation social science (jointly held with DICE), cultural domain analysis, research design, and computer applications, as well as field trips.

Throughout your Master's, you spend time thinking about and preparing for your dissertation project, which is the culmination of the programme. If you are looking to study overseas you can apply for funding from outside bodies as well as for support from the School. You prepare proposals, practice methods, arrange for permits and letters of consent, and, if necessary take language classes to prepare for around eight weeks of research between April and 1 July. You then write a 15,000 word dissertation that goes beyond a simple research report to argue a theoretical point and discuss research findings in much wider contexts. Increasingly, our students are going on to publish edited versions of their projects and are making substantive contributions to the research, development or conservation projects they work with.

National ratings:

In the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014, research by the School of Anthropology and Conservation was ranked 10th for research power and in the top 20 in the UK for research impact and research intensity.

An impressive 94% of our research was judged to be of international quality and the School’s environment was judged to be conducive to supporting the development of world-leading research.

In the latest Student Barometer survey 100% of our postgraduate students were satisfied with the academic content of their course and 97% said they found their programme intellectually stimulating.

Careers:

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Centre, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This relationship ensures that successful completion of our courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. Studying anthropology, you develop an understanding of the complexity of all actions, beliefs and discourse by acquiring strong methodological and analytical skills. Anthropologists are increasingly being hired by companies and organisations that recognise the value of employing people who understand the complexities of societies and organisations.

Many of our alumni teach in academic positions in universities across the world, while others work for a wide range of organisations. Examples of positions held by our alumni include:

  • Project director for the Global Diversity Foundation
  • Curator at Beirut Botanic Gardens.

Programme Structure

Teaching for coursework takes place in the first and second terms. During the third term and the summer period, you prepare your dissertation on a topic that reflects your own individual interests and experience.

Modules:

Please note that modules are subject to change. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

  • Theory and Ethnography in Social Anthropology I
  • Research Methods in Social Anthropology
  • Environmental Anthropology
  • Ethnobiological Knowledge Systems
  • Research Methods in Social Anthropology II
  • Lowland South American Anthropology
  • Visual Anthropology Theory
  • The Ethnography of Central Asian Societies
  • Social Science Perspectives on Environmental Issues
  • Contemporary Ethnography in Environmental Anthropology
  • Dissertation: Environmental Anthropology
  • Advanced Topics in Medicinal Plants
  • International Wildlife Trade - Achieving Sustainability
For more information, please visit the programme's website.

Detailed Programme Facts

  • Programme intensity

    You can choose to do this programme part-time or full-time.

    Full-time
    • Full-time duration 12 months
    Part-time
    • Average part-time duration 24 months
    • Intensity Flexible
    • Part-time variant
      Flexible
  • Credits
    90 ECTS 180 alternative credits
    • Total Kent credits: MA 180; MSc 180
    • Total ECTS credits: MA 90; MSc 90
  • Languages
    • English
  • Delivery mode
    On Campus
Check if you match the admission requirements

English Language Requirements

You only need to take one of these language tests:

  • Minimum required score:

    6.5

    The IELTS – or the International English Language Test System – tests your English-language abilities (writing, listening, speaking, and reading) on a scale of 1.00–9.00. The minimum IELTS score requirement refers to which Overall Band Score you received, which is your combined average score. Read more about IELTS.

    Take IELTS test

    StudyPortals Tip: The UK government has confirmed new English-language testing requirements for visa and immigration purposes. Learn more

  • Minimum required score (Grade B2):

    176

    The CAE test – or the Cambridge Advanced English – is an exam for applicants who wish to get a Certificate in Advanced English. To receive the Advanced certificate, test-takers must score between 142 and 210 on the Cambridge English: Advanced test. Read more about CAE.

    Note: degree programmes and applications may require a more specific minimum score for admission.

  • Minimum required score:

    90

    The TOEFL – or Test Of English as a Foreign Language – offers an internet-based test (iBT). The final, overall iBT score ranges between 0 and 120, and includes a scaled average from the four components (reading, listening, speaking, and writing). Read more about TOEFL (iBT).

Academic Requirements

You need the following GPA score:

Required score: Upper Second Class

Applicants for graduate programs must have the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree with a minimum GPA equivalent to Upper Second Class on the UK Honour scale. Admitted applicants typically have an undergraduate GPA of or better on the UK Honour scale. No exam grade should be lower than 4.5 (European grade scale) or D (American grade scale).

Your GPA (Grade Point Average) is calculated using the grades that you received in each course, and is determined by the points assigned to each grade (e.g. for the US grading scale from A-F).

A good honours degree (2.1 or above) in anthropology or other associated fields, including environmental studies.

All applicants are considered on an individual basis and additional qualifications, and professional qualifications and experience will also be taken into account when considering applications. 

Tuition Fee

  • International

    14670 GBP/year
    Tuition Fee
    Based on the original amount of 14670 GBP per year and a duration of 12 months.
  • EU/EEA

    6500 GBP/year
    Tuition Fee
    Based on the original amount of 6500 GBP per year and a duration of 12 months.
MA degree:
  • Part-time: UK/EU: £3,250; Overseas: £7,340
MSc degree:
  • Full-time: UK/EU: £9,250; Overseas: £17,210
  • Part-time: UK/EU: £4,630; Overseas: £8,610

Funding

Scholarships:

The University of Kent has a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students. This funding includes Research Council Funded Scholarships, available for Postgraduate Research projects.

Loans:

Eligible students can borrow up to £10,280. In order to be eligible for a loan, you have to be a UK national or have a “settled status, but there are no restrictions on how long you can stay.

StudyPortals Tip: Students can search online for independent or external scholarships that can help fund their studies. Check the scholarships to see whether you are eligible to apply. Many scholarships are either merit-based or needs-based.