University of Glasgow

Glasgow, United Kingdom

No. Students: 23,600
Funding type: Public
Campuses:
Listed programmes:
Type of education:
University ranking:

*: Approximate


A leading research centre

We are a member of the prestigious Russell Group of leading UK research universities, and were striving to change the world with our expertise. Our annual research contract income totals more than £116m, which puts us in the UKs top 10 earners for research. It also means that we can make important discoveries, whether thats finding a way to detect malaria in minutes, or contributing to the biggest particle physics experiment in the world: the Large Hadron Collider.

Excellence in teaching

Our research-led approach is one of the reasons why a degree from the University of Glasgow is so prized, but our students also benefit from opportunities to study abroad, improve their employability, take part in work placements and explore a wide range of social activities. As a result, we welcome scholars from more than 100 countries around the world every year. The 2010 International Student Barometer ranks us 3rd in the UK, and 90% of our final year undergraduates report satisfaction with their experiences. Our students graduate equipped with the skills they need to compete in a global workplace, and with friendships and networks that last a lifetime.

Working with others

We know we cannot succeed alone, which is why we work with partners and friends in Glasgow, Scotland and beyond. Whether were sharing expertise on climate change and disease prevention in developing countries, or offering investment to kickstart new collaborations with growing companies in Scotland, the benefits of our ever-expanding network of friendships and partnerships are wide-ranging and reciprocal.

About

The University of Glasgow is one of the world's top 100 universities

By continuing to invest in internationally excellent research and by providing an outstanding learning environment for talented students from all backgrounds our aim is not only to maintain this position, but to improve upon it, thereby retaining our status as one of the select number of institutions which are regarded as being the best in the world.

Our mission

Our mission is to undertake leading-edge, internationally-competitive research while offering a challenging student-centred learning environment. Through our status as a leading international university, we aim to sustain and add value to Scottish culture and society, to the natural environment and to the national economy.

A long pedigree

Founded in 1451, we are the fourth oldest university in the United Kingdom and have nearly 16000 undergraduates, 4000 postgraduates and 4000 adults in continuing education. We welcome students from over 80 countries.

A research powerhouse

The University is a major research powerhouse, with our annual research contract income in the top ten of UK universities. An exceptional 96% of our research-active staff are in areas which have been independently assessed as producing research of international importance.

Outstanding teaching quality

We offer an exceptional breadth of undergraduate student choice across the physical and life sciences, the social sciences and the humanities, together with a rapidly-expanding range of postgraduate courses. Our teaching quality has been independently rated as among the top ten in the UK and our medical and veterinary schools are consistently rated amongst the very best in the UK.

Working together

We cannot succeed alone and we work closely with partners and friends in the city, Scotland and beyond to ensure that we are an internationally successful university at the heart of Glasgow.

Services

The University is currently spread over a number of different campuses. The main one is the Gilmorehill campus, in Hillhead. As well as this there is the Garscube Estate in Bearsden, housing the Veterinary School and much of the University's sports facilities, the Dental School in the city centre, and the Crichton campus in Dumfries, operated jointly by the University of Glasgow, the University of the West of Scotland and the Open University. The University has also established joint departments with the Glasgow School of Art and in naval architecture with the University of Strathclyde.

High Street

The University's initial accommodation was part of the complex of religious buildings in the precincts of Glasgow Cathedral. In 1460, the University received a grant of land from James, Lord Hamilton, on the east side of the High Street, immediately north of the Blackfriars Church, on which it had its home for the next four hundred years. In the mid-seventeenth century, the Hamilton Building was replaced with a very grand two-court building with a decorated west front facing the High Street, called the "Nova Erectio", or New Building.

Over the following centuries, the University's size and scope continued to expand. In 1757 it built the Macfarlane Observatory and later Scotland's first public museum, the Hunterian. It was a centre of the Scottish Enlightenment and subsequently of the Industrial Revolution, and its expansion in the High Street was constrained. The area around the University declined as well-off residents moved westwards with expansion of the city and overcrowding of the immediate area by less well-off residents. It was this rapid slumming of the area that was a chief catalyst of the University's migration westward.

Gilmorehill

Consequently, in 1870, it moved to a (then greenfield) site on Gilmorehill in the West End of the city, around three miles (5 km) west of its previous location, enclosed by a large meander of the River Kelvin. The original site on the High Street was sold to the City of Glasgow Union Railway and replaced by the College Goods yard. The new-build campus was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in the Gothic revival style. The largest of these buildings echoed, on a far grander scale, the original High Street campus's twin-quadrangle layout, and may have been inspired by Ypres' late medieval Cloth Hall; Gilmorehill in turn inspired the design of the Clocktower complex of buildings for the new University of Otago in New Zealand. In 1879, Gilbert Scott's son, Oldrid, completed this original vision by building an open undercroft forming two quadrangles, above which is his grand Bute Hall (used for examinations and graduation ceremonies). Oldrid also later added a spire to the buildings' signature gothic bell tower in 1887. The blond sandstone cladding and Gothic design of the building's exterior belie the modernity of its Victorian construction; Scott's building is structured upon what was then a cutting-edge riveted iron frame construction, supporting a lightweight wooden-beam roof. The building also forms the second-largest example of Gothic revival architecture in Britain, after the Palace of Westminster. An illustration of the Main Building currently features on the reverse side of the current series of £100 notes issued by the Clydesdale Bank.

The University's Hunterian Museum resides in the Main Building, and the related Hunterian Gallery is housed in buildings adjacent to the University Library. The latter includes "The Mackintosh House", a rebuilt terraced house designed by, and furnished after, architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

Even these enlarged premises could not contain the expanding University, which quickly spread across much of Gilmorehill. The 1930s saw the construction of the award-winning round Reading Room (it is now a category-A listed building) and an aggressive programme of house purchases, in which the University (fearing the surrounding district of Hillhead was running out of suitable building land) acquired several terraces of Victorian houses and joined them together internally. The departments of Psychology, Computing Science and most of the Arts Faculty continue to be housed in these terraces.

More buildings were built to the west of the Main Builidng, developing the land between University Avenue and the River Kelvin with natural science buildings and the faculty of medicine. The medical school spread into neighbouring Partick and joined with the Western General Infirmary. At the eastern flank of the Main Building, the James Watt Engineering Building was completed in 1959. The growth and prosperity of the city, which had originally forced the University's relocation to Hillhead, again proved problematic when more real estate was required. The school of veterinary medicine, which was founded in 1862, moved to a new campus in the leafy surrounds of Garscube Estate on the edge of the city in 1954. The university later moved its sports ground and associated facilities to Anniesland (around two miles (3 km) west of the main campus) and built student halls of residence in both Anniesland and Maryhill.

The growth of tertiary education, as a result of the Robbins Report in the 1960s, led the University to build numerous modern buildings across Hillhead, including several brutalist concrete blocks: the Mathematics building; the Boyd Orr Building and the Adam Smith building (housing the Faculty of Law, Business and Social Sciences, named after university graduate Adam Smith). Other additions around this time, including the new glass-lined Glasgow University Library, Rankine Building for Civil Engineering (named for William John Macquorn Rankine) and the amber-brick Gregory Building (housing the Geology department), were more in keeping with Gilmorehill's leafy suburban architecture. The erection of these buildings in the late 1960s however involved the demolition of a large number of houses in Ashton Road, and rerouting the west end of University Avenue to its current position. To cater for the expanding student population, a new refectory, known as the Hub, was opened adjacent to the library in 1966. The Glasgow University Union also had an extension completed in 1965 and the new Queen Margaret Union building opened in 1969.

In October 2001 the century-old Bower Building (previously home to the university's botany department) was gutted by fire. The interior and roof of the building were largely destroyed, although the main facade remained intact. After a £10.8 million refit, the building re-opened in November 2004.

The Wolfson Medical School Building, with its award-winning glass-fronted atrium, opened in 2002, and in 2003, the St Andrews Building was opened, housing the Faculty of Education. It is sited a short walk from Gilmorehill, in the Woodlands area of the city on the site of the former Queens College, which had in turn been bought by Glasgow Caledonian University, from whom the university acquired the site. It replaced the St Andrews Campus in Bearsden. The University also procured the former Hillhead Congregational Church, converting it into a lecture theatre in 2005. The Sir Alwyn Williams building, designed by Reiach and Hall, was completed at Lilybank Terrace in 2007, housing the Department of Computing Science.

Chapel
The University Chapel was constructed as a memorial to the 755 sons of the University who had lost their lives in the First World War. Designed by Sir John Burnet, it was completed in 1929 and dedicated on 4 October. Tablets on the wall behind the Communion Table list the names of those who died, while other tablets besides the stalls record the 405 members of the University community who gave their lives in the Second World War. Most of the windows are the work of Douglas Strachan, although some have been added over the years, including those on the South Wall, created by Alan Younger.

Daily services are held in the Chapel during term-time, as well as seasonal events. Before Christmas, there is a Service of Nine Lessons and Carols on the last Sunday of term, and a Watchnight service on Christmas Eve. Graduates, students, members of staff and the children of members of staff are entitled to be married in the Chapel, which is also used for baptisms, funerals. Civil marriages and civil partnerships may be blessed in the Chapel, although under UK law may not be performed there.

The current Chaplain of the University is the Reverend Stuart MacQuarrie, and the University appoints Honorary Chaplains of other denominations.

Library and Archives
The University Library, situated on Hillhead Street opposite the Main Building, is one of the oldest and largest libraries in Europe. Situated over 12 floors, it holds more than 2.5 million books and journals, as well as providing access to an extensive range of electronic resources including over 30,000 electronic journals. It also houses sections for periodicals, microfilms, special collections and rare materials. Open between 7am-2am, 361 days of the year, the Library provides a resource not only for the academic community in Glasgow, but also for scholars worldwide. There are study spaces for more than 2,500 students, with over 800 computers, and wi-fi access is available throughout the building.

In addition to the main library, subject libraries also exist for Chemistry, Dental Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Education, Law, and the faculty of Social Sciences, which are held in branch libraries around the campus. In 2007, a state of the art section to house the library's collection of historic photographs was opened, funded by the Wolfson Foundation.

The Archives of the University of Glasgow are the central place of deposit for the records of the University, created and accumulated since its foundation in 1451.

Crichton Campus, Dumfries

The University opened a campus in the town of Dumfries in Dumfries and GallowayCrichton campus, designed to meet the needs for tertiary education in an area far from major concentrations of population, is operated jointly by the University of Glasgow, the University of the West of Scotland and the Open University. It offers a modular undergraduate curriculum, leading to one of a small number of liberal arts degrees, as well as providing the region's only access to postgraduate study. during the 1980s. The

Non-teaching facilities

As well as these teaching campuses the University has halls of residence in and around the North-West of the city, accommodating a total of approximately 3,500 students.These are the Murano Street halls in Maryhill; Wolfson halls on the Garscube Estate; Queen Margaret halls, in Kelvinside; Cairncross House and Kelvinhaugh Gate, in Yorkhill. In recent years, Dalrymple House and Horslethill halls in Dowanhill, Reith halls in North Kelvinside and the Maclay halls in Park Circus (near Kelvingrove Park), have closed and been sold, as the development value of such property increased.

The Stevenson Building on Gilmorehill, opened in 1961 and provides students with the use of a fitness suite, squash courts, sauna and six-lane 25m swimming pool. The University also has a large sports complex on the Garscube Estate, beside their Wolfson Halls and Vet School. This is a new facility, replacing the previous WesterlandsAnniesland area of the city, which was sold for housing. The university also has a boathouse situated at Glasgow Green on the River Clyde. It is out of here that the Glasgow University Boat Club trains. sports ground in the

Student life

For those who are new to the city, Glasgow is a wonderful place to explore, to try something new, develop your skills and get a world class education. Those students already living in Glasgow will know what a great city it is, but will now get to experience it from the perspective of a new student.

Glasgow is one of the most exciting cities in the UK and has one of the largest student populations. You will find something to cater for every taste, be it dancing until 3am, shopping for the latest fashions, sampling some of the local music, or relaxing in one of the many coffee shops.

The University offers many opportunities to get involved in student life. Join one of our two Student Unions, both offering endless hours of entertainment. Become a member of a club or society or start your own an ideal way to make new friends. Make a difference by standing for election in the Students Representative Council. You can even become a Student Ambassador and assist at Open Days and Campus Visits. These are just a few of the ways you can make your time at university as fulfilling and exciting as possible. Life at the University of Glasgow is more than just getting a degree.

Accommodation

Living in University halls of residence is a perfect way to settle into university life as its the ideal place to make new friends. With so many students in the same place its impossible not to meet someone you like.

The University has around 3,500 residential spaces available for its students with approximately a quarter of those designated as best suited for postgraduate students. Providing you have firmly accepted an unconditional offer, or met the conditions of a conditional offer from the University of Glasgow, and have submitted your application for residence before the 22nd August, then you are guaranteed accommodation.

A range of accommodation is available, from self-catering flats to more traditional halls of residence. All residences are furnished with internet access and have fully trained support staff to advise on a wide range of matters. There is also a free SRC Halls to Campus minibus service.

Master's Programmes at University of Glasgow

School of Vetirenary Medicine

Institute of Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology

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